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Next: Organization of the Book Up: Motivating Cognitive Phenomena and Previous: Competition

Learning

 

      The well-worn nature versus nurture debate on the development of human intelligence is inevitably decided in terms of both. Thus, both the genetic configuration of the brain and the results of learning make important contributions. However, this fact does nothing to advance our understanding of exactly how genetic configuration and learning interact to produce adult human cognition. Attaining this understanding is a major goal of computational cognitive neuroscience, which is in the unique position of being able to simulate the kinds of complex and subtle interdependencies that can exist between certain properties of the brain and the learning process.

    In addition to the developmental learning process, learning occurs constantly in adult cognition. Thus, if it were possible to identify a relatively simple learning mechanism that could, with an appropriately instantiated initial architecture, organize the billions of neurons in the human brain to produce the whole range of cognitive functions we exhibit, this would obviously be the ``holy grail'' of cognitive neuroscience. For this reason, this text is dominated by a concern for the properties of such a learning mechanism, the biological and cognitive environment in which it operates, and the results it might produce. Of course, this focus does not diminish the importance of the genetic basis of cognition. Indeed, we feel that it is perhaps only in the context of such a learning mechanism that genetic parameters can be fully understood, much as the role of DNA itself in shaping the phenotype must be understood in the context of the emergent developmental process.

    A consideration of what it takes to learn reveals an important dependence on gradedness and other aspects of the biological mechanisms discussed above. The problem of learning can be considered as the problem of change. When you learn, you change the way that information is processed by the system. Thus, it is much easier to learn if the system responds to these changes in a graded, proportional manner, instead of radically altering the way it behaves. These graded changes allow the system to try out various new ideas (ways of processing things), and get some kind of graded, proportional indication of how these changes affect processing. By exploring lots of little changes, the system can evaluate and strengthen those that improve performance, while abandoning those that do not. Thus, learning is very much like the bootstrapping phenomenon described with respect to processing earlier: both depend on using a number of weak, graded signals as ``feelers'' for exploring possibly useful directions to proceed further, and then building on those that look promising.

  None of this kind of bootstrapping is possible in a discrete system like a standard serial computer, which often responds catastrophically to even small changes. Another way of putting this is that a computer program typically only works if everything is right -- a program that is missing just one step typically provides little indication of how well it would perform if it were complete. The same thing is true of a system of logical relationships, which typically unravels into nonsense if even just one logical assertion is incorrect. Thus, discrete systems are typically too brittle to provide an effective substrate for learning.

        However, although we present a view of learning that is dominated by this bootstrapping of small changes idea, other kinds of learning are more discrete in nature. One of these is a ``trial and error'' kind of learning that is more familiar to our conscious experience. Here, there is a discrete ``hypothesis'' that governs behavior during a ``trial,'' the outcome of which (``error'') is used to update the hypothesis next time around. Although this has a more discrete flavor, we find that it can best be implemented using the same kinds of graded neural mechanisms as the other kinds of learning (more on this in chapter 11). Another more discrete kind of learning is associated with the ``memorization'' of particular discrete facts or events. It appears that the brain has a specialized area that is particularly good at this kind of learning (called the hippocampus), which has properties that give its learning a more discrete character. We will discuss this type of learning further in chapter 9.

 


next up previous contents
Next: Organization of the Book Up: Motivating Cognitive Phenomena and Previous: Competition

Randall C. O'Reilly
Fri Apr 28 14:15:16 MDT 2000