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Parallelism

 

  Everyone knows the old joke about not being able to walk and chew gum at the same time. This is a simple case of processing multiple things in parallel (doing more than one thing at the same time). In our everyday experience, there are lots of examples of a situation where this kind of parallel processing is evident: having a conversation while driving or doing anything else (cooking, eating, watching TV, etc.); hearing your name at a cocktail party while talking to someone else (the aptly named ``cocktail party effect''); and speaking what you are reading (reading aloud), to name just a few.

What may come as a surprise to you is that each of the individual processes from the above examples is itself the product of a large number of processes working in parallel. At the lowest level of analysis, we know that the human brain contains something like 10 billion neurons, and that each one contributes its little bit to overall human cognition. Thus, biologically, cognition must emerge from the parallel operation of all these neurons. We refer to this as parallel distributed processing (PDP) -- the processing for any given cognitive function is distributed in parallel across a large number of individual processing elements. This parallelism occurs at many different levels, from brain areas to small groups of neurons to neurons themselves.

    For example, when you look at a visual scene, one part of your brain processes the visual information to identify what you are seeing, while another part identifies where things are. Although you are not aware that this information is being processed separately, people who have lesions in one of these brain areas but not the other can only do one of these things! Thus, the apparently seamless and effortless way in which we view the world is really a product of a bunch of specialized brain areas, operating ``under the hood'' in a tightly coordinated fashion. As this hood is being opened using modern neuroimaging techniques, the parallelism of the brain is becoming even more obvious, as multiple brain areas are inevitably activated in most cognitive tasks.

Parallel processing can make it challenging to understand cognition, to figure out how all these subprocesses coordinate with each other to end up doing something sensible as a whole. In contrast, if cognition were just a bunch of discrete sequential steps, the task would be much easier: just identify the steps and their sequence! Instead, parallelism is more like the many-body problem in physics: understanding any pairwise interaction between two things can be simple, but once you have a number of these things all operating at the same time and mutually influencing each other, it becomes very difficult to figure out what is going on.

One virtue of the approach to cognition presented in this book is that it is based from the start on parallel distributed processing, providing powerful mathematical and intuitive tools for understanding how collective interactions between a large number of processing units (i.e., neurons) can lead to something useful (i.e., cognition).

 


next up previous contents
Next: Gradedness Up: Motivating Cognitive Phenomena and Previous: Motivating Cognitive Phenomena and

Randall C. O'Reilly
Fri Apr 28 14:15:16 MDT 2000