THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
STEREOTYPING & PREJUDICE LABORATORY

CUSP - The CU Stereotyping and Prejudice Lab - meets weekly throughout the year to design, evaluate, and learn about research on this topic of inquiry. Headed by social psychologists Irene Blair, Josh Correll, Tiffany Ito, Chick Judd, Chris Loersch, and Bernadette Park, CUSP offers a unique venue for students and faculty to present their work and receive feedback throughout all stages of the research process. Attendees typically include participating faculty, their graduate students, and undergraduate research assistants.

The CUSP lab conducts both basic and applied research related to stereotyping, prejudice, and intergroup relations. We seek to understand the core psychological processes that influence these constructs, examining their operation in both laboratory and field settings. We use a broad set of measures in this work, including traditional surveys and questionnaires, computerized tasks that tap these variables at more automatic or spontaneous levels, and neural indicators of the actual brain activity that underlies these processes.

CUSP members are currently researching social categorization, implicit stereotypes and their moderation, context effects on stereotyping, ideological perspectives on ethnic diversity, interpersonal and intergroup powers and stereotyping, visual salience in stereotyping, interpersonal communication and stereotypes, inhibition and control of stereotype and prejudice expression, affect and prejudice, and religious stereotypes... among others.

Interested in Getting Involved?


Prospective Graduate Students: Potential graduate students interested in joining the CUSP lab should apply to the University of Colorado's Social Psychology Program. Application materials for the social psychology graduate program can be accessed by clicking here. Students interested in discussing specific graduate research opportunities are encouraged to contact CUSP faculty directly.

For Current CU Undergraduates: The success of our work depends on the involvement of dedicated undergraduate students. Getting involved with research as an undergraduate is a great way to learn about the research process and get hands-on experience. This is especially valuable for students considering going on to graduate school. Most positions are voluntary, but you may choose to receive course credit for your work.

REQUIREMENTS: Minimum 3.00 GPA. Major in supervising faculty's primary academic department. Commitment to work in a research laboratory for one year. Ability to volunteer nine hours of time per week. Please contact individual CUSP faculty members about position availability.