Psychology 3102:
Introduction to Behavioral Genetics
Fall 2019

TH 12:30 - 13:45,  Muenzinger E417 (Undergraduate)


Instructor:
Gregory Carey
Office: Muenzinger D261B
Phones: 492-1658
FAX: 492-2967
Email: gregory.carey@colorado.edu
Home Page: http://psych.colorado.edu/~carey

Office Hours:
(1) Official: Before or after class
(2) Semi-official: Call/email for appointments
(3) Very unofficial: Fridays after 5:30: Med, Hungry Toad
 NOTE:  I am very flexible about seeing students, so do not hesitate to drop in unannounced.

 

Course Requirements:

Consistent lecture attendance is not mandatory but is strongly encouraged for three reasons.  First, the majority of the most important material is covered in the lectures.  Second, some sections of the reading can be complicated and others give details meant for graduate students.  Lecture attendance can help you to sort out the important material from the background information.  Third, dates of tests and assignments listed later under “Tentative Schedule” are indeed tentative.  The actual date of tests and assignments will be announced in class at least one week before the actual test or assignment.  Students are responsible for knowing the dates of tests and assignments.  If you miss class and require information about tests or assignments, please contact me.

Grading is based on performance on the tests and papers.  Raw points are added and letter grades are based on breakpoints rather than on percent correct.  Your instructor has never experienced a semester in which students would have done better on a “percent correct” basis than on the curve.  It is the student’s responsibility to make certain that all assignments—tests and papers—are completed on time.  Exceptions must be approved by the instructor.

 

DO NOT EMAIL ASSIGNMENTS unless you have made special arrangements with me beforehand!

 

Campus and Departmental Policies aned Resources:

This course follows all statements required by campus Academnic Affairs on disabilities, religious observances, classroom behavior, discrimination and harassment, and the honor code/ They may be found here. Other links to campus policies, customs, and guidelines may be found here. Links to departmental policies and resources for undergraduates may be found here. If you require assistance with a disability, please le me know as soon as possible.

   

Textbook:

The traditional textbook for this course has been Carey, G. (2003) Human Genetics for the Social Sciences.  Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. I am in the process of revising this and do not know yet how far I will get during the semester. Revisions will be placed on the web site and the syllabus updated as needs dictate. Pay attention during class for announcements on new sections as they become available.

 

Course Web Pages:

http://psych.colorado.edu/~carey/Courses/PSYC3102/

http://psych.colorado.edu/hgss

http://psych.colorado.edu/~carey/hgss2/hgss2.php

VERY HANDY: Glossary of Genetic Terms

 

General Outline of the Course:

This section of behavioral genetics deals exclusively with human behavior.  Animal models, breeding regimens, and methodology specific to animals will not be covered.  The reason for the selected content is entirely practical--there is insufficient time to cover both animal and human behavioral genetics in a one semester course.
            The course is divided into three general modules:

Module 1: Genetics. This section of the course will introduce the social science student to the science of genetics. Topics include molecular genetics, Mendelian genetics, metabolic disorders, chromosomal disorders, linkage and association designs, and the genetics of complex disorders.  Although the material in this module is largely factual and objective, the examples of basic genetic principles are behavioral.  The major goal of this section is to appreciate the numerous ways and mechanisms in which genes can influence behavior and social influences can influence gene expression.  Because this module is quite lengthy, two tests are usually given.

Module 2: Individual Differences. Why are some people shy while other people are very outgoing?  Why do some people do well at school while others struggle just to pass?  This section of the course examines the roles that genes play in creating individual differences among us humans. Topics include overviews of the twin and adoption designs, the genetics of personality, the genetics of cognitive ability, and the genetics of psychopathology.  The final exam covers this section of the course.

Module 3: Evolution and Evolutionary Psychology. This section of the course examines behavior from the perspective of evolution. Topics include population genetics and the principles of evolution, biological constraints on behavior, human behavioral adaptations, and mate preferences.  The major goal of this section is to appreciate how millions of years of mammalian and primate evolution contributes to many different aspects of our behavior today.  Often a paper is given in place of an exam for this section of the course.


 

 

Tentative Schedule:

NOTE VERY WELL:  This schedule is tentative, especially with regard to the dates of tests.  Usually, tests do not occur on the dates falling on this schedule.  I want to finish a certain amount of material and then give a test on that material.  The date for a test will always be announced at least one week prior to the test.  

 

Date:

Topic

Reading

Slides

08/27

Introduction

 

 

08/29

History I

HGSS2: History

  HGSS2: History

09/03

History II

HGSS2: Genetics & Politics

HGSS2 Lemonade

 

09/05

The Cell

HGSS2 The Cell

HGSS2: The Cell

09/10

Chromosomes

HGSS2 Chromosomes

HGSS2 Chromosomes

09/12

DNA and Protein Synthesis

HGSS2 DNA

HGSS DNA

Genome Sizes

09/17

09/19

Epigenesis

HGSS2 Epigenesis

HGSS2 Epigenesis

GMO Salmon

02/24

Catch up / Review

 

 

02/26

Exam I

 

 

 

 

 

 

10/01 -

10/08


Mendel and Mendelian Traits

HGSS2 Mendel

HGSS2 Mendelian Traits

HGSS Mendel

HGSS Mendelian Traits: Intro 

HGSS Mendelian Traits: PKU

HGSS Mendelian Traits: Fragile X

HGSS Mendelian Traits: CAH

HGSS Mendelian Traits: SCA

10/10

 

Gene Hunting: Polymorphisms

HGSS2 Polymorphisms

HGSS2 Polymorphisms

HGSS DNA Arrays

10/15

Gene Hunting: Designs

HGSS2 Gene Hunting;

HGSS2 Human Identify Testing

HGSS2 Gene Hunting

HGSS Forensics

10/17

Morgan, Linkage, Haplotypes

HGSS2 Morgan

HGSS2 Morgan

10/22

10/24

Disorders with Complex Genetics

HGSS2: DCGs

HGSS2: DCG

HGSS2: Threshold Model (Grad)

10/29

Chromosomal Anomalies

HGSS: Chromosomal Anomalies

HGSS2 Chromosomal Anomalies

10/31

11/5

Catch up / Review

 

 

11/07

Exam 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

11/12

Heritability and Quantitative Methods

HGSS2: Quantitative I (Graduate)

HGSS2: Quantitative II (Graduate)

  HGSS2: Estimating Genetic Parameters (Graduate)

11/14

Intelligence I

HGSS: IQ 1

HGSS IQ

11/19

Intelligence II

HGSS: IQ 2

11/21

Personality

HGSS: Personality

HGSS Personality

11/26

Fall Break

 

 

11/28

Thanksgiving

 

 

12/03

Psychopathology

HGSS: Psychopathology

HGSS2 Psychopathology;

HGSS Antisocial Behavior

12/05

Evolution

HGSS2 Intro to Module 2

12/10

Evolutionary Psychology

HGSS2 Intro to Evolutionary Psychology

12/12

Genetics of Human Populations

  TO BE POSTED

HGSS: Human Evolution

HGSS2: Populations & Race

12/15

Final Exam 4:30 - 7:30

  Final Exam Questions